Greater amberjack

Seriola dumerili

Seriola dumerili (Greater amberjack)
Taxonomy
    • Osteichthyes
      • Carangiformes
        • Carangidae
          • Seriola dumerili
Distribution
Distribution map: Seriola dumerili (Greater amberjack)

Information


Author: João L. Saraiva
Version: 2.0 (2021-12-21)

Cite

Reviewers: Pablo Arechavala-Lopez, Jenny Volstorf
Editor: Billo Heinzpeter Studer

Cite as: »Saraiva, João L.. 2021. Seriola dumerili (Farm: Short Profile). In: FishEthoBase, ed. Fish Ethology and Welfare Group. World Wide Web electronic publication. First published 2017-06-21. Version 2.0. https://fishethobase.net.«





FishEthoScore/farm

Seriola dumerili
LiPoCe
Criteria
Home range
Depth range
Migration
Reproduction
Aggregation
Aggression
Substrate
Stress
Malformations
Slaughter


Condensed assessment of the species' likelihood and potential for good fish welfare in aquaculture, based on ethological findings for 10 crucial criteria.

Li = Likelihood that the individuals of the species experience good welfare under minimal farming conditions
Po = Potential of the individuals of the species to experience good welfare under high-standard farming conditions
Ce = Certainty of our findings in Likelihood and Potential

FishEthoScore = Sum of criteria scoring "High" (max. 10)

Legend

High
Medium
Low
Unclear
No findings



General remarks

Seriola diumerili is a valuable species for aquaculture due to its high commercial value and depleting stocks in the wild. However its welfare in aquaculture is hindered by its spatial needs, since it is a pelagic open water cruiser. In addition, its spawning under farming conditions is majorly induced and invasive, and survival rates of early life stages are very low. Several aspects that are important for farming remain unknown, such as aggression in juveniles and adults, stress, malformation rates and an established humane slaughter protocol. Solving these issues may provide solutions for farming under better welfare conditions.




1  Home range

Many species traverse in a limited horizontal space (even if just for a certain period of time per year); the home range may be described as a species' understanding of its environment (i.e., its cognitive map) for the most important resources it needs access to. What is the probability of providing the species' whole home range in captivity?

It is low for minimal and high-standard farming conditions. Our conclusion is based on a high amount of evidence.

Likelihood
Potential
Certainty

LARVAE: WILD: pelagic, develop offshore 1. FARM: circular tanks: ca 20 m3 2; mesocosm 40 m3 3.

JUVENILES: WILD: pelagic 4 5 6. Swim ca 3.7 nautical miles per day 7. FARM: net cages: 7 m3 (diameter 4.5 m) 8, 5-10 x 5-10 m 9

ADULTS:  JUVENILES

SPAWNERSWILD: pelagic 10 6, approach shore when spawning 11. Swim ca 3.7 nautical miles per day 7FARM: natural spawning tanks: 500 m3 12; maturation tanks for induced spawning 30 – 40 m3 13 13, 70 m3 14LAB:  maturation tanks 10 m3 (3 x 3 x 1.5 m) 15.




2  Depth range

Given the availability of resources (food, shelter) or the need to avoid predators, species spend their time within a certain depth range. What is the probability of providing the species' whole depth range in captivity?

It is low for minimal and high-standard farming conditions. Our conclusion is based on a high amount of evidence.

Likelihood
Potential
Certainty

LARVAE: WILD: pelagic, develop in the open ocean 1. FARM: no data found yet.

JUVENILES: WILD: 20 - 70 m, occasionally down to 360 m 16 2. FARM: net cages: 5-15 m 8 9

ADULTS JUVENILES

SPAWNERSWILD: 20 - 70 m, occasionally down to 360 m 16 2. FARM: maturation tanks 10 m3 (3 x 3 x 1.5 m) 15.




3  Migration

Some species undergo seasonal changes of environments for different purposes (feeding, spawning, etc.) and with them, environmental parameters (photoperiod, temperature, salinity) may change, too. What is the probability of providing farming conditions that are compatible with the migrating or habitat-changing behaviour of the species?

It is low for minimal and high-standard farming conditions. Our conclusion is based on a medium amount of evidence.

Likelihood
Potential
Certainty

OCEANODROMOUS 17.

LARVAE: WILD: pelagic, develop offshore 1FARM: saltwater 2 3. For details of holding systems  crit. 1 and 2.

JUVENILESWILD: pelagic 4 5 6, swim large distances in the open ocean 7. Sometimes epibenthic feeding 5FARM: sea cages  8 9. For details of holding systems  crit. 1 and 2.

ADULTS JUVENILES

SPAWNERSWILD: pelagic 10 6 5, approach shore when spawning 11FARM: saltwater tanks 15. For details of holding systems  crit. 1 and 2.




4  Reproduction

A species reproduces at a certain age, season, and sex ratio and possibly involving courtship rituals. What is the probability of the species reproducing naturally in captivity without manipulation?

It is low for minimal farming conditions. It is high for high-standard farming conditions. Our conclusion is based on a medium amount of evidence.

Likelihood
Potential
Certainty

WILD: spawn in spring-summer 11 1. Pair spawners, male courts and pursues female, pair may be followed by 1-10 indviduals 18FARM: natural reproduction is impaired in most farming conditions 19 15 20, although it is possibe to achieve 12. Reproduction dysfunctions occur in captivity 20, spawning is often hormonally induced 19 13 15 2. A large part of production comes from wild-caught juveniles 2.




5  Aggregation

Species differ in the way they co-exist with conspecifics or other species from being solitary to aggregating unstructured, casually roaming in shoals or closely coordinating in schools of varying densities. What is the probability of providing farming conditions that are compatible with the aggregation behaviour of the species?

It is high for minimal and high-standard farming conditions. Our conclusion is based on a medium amount of evidence.

Likelihood
Potential
Certainty

LARVAE: WILD: planktonic, occur naturally in large numbers 21. FARM: tanks: 5 - 12 larvae/L 2 22 9; mesocosm 0.25 larvae/L 3.

JUVENILES: WILD: aggregate 1 23, display schooling behaviour 24 18. FARM: net cages: ca 1 ind/m3 8.

ADULTS JUVENILES.

SPAWNERSWILD: Form spawning aggregations 25. FARM: maturation tanks for induced spawning: ca 1 ind/m3 (4.14 kg/m315; tanks for natural spawning: ca 0.16 ind/m3 (0.2 kg/m3) 12.




6  Aggression

There is a range of adverse reactions in species, spanning from being relatively indifferent towards others to defending valuable resources (e.g., food, territory, mates) to actively attacking opponents. What is the probability of the species being non-aggressive and non-territorial in captivity?

There are unclear findings for minimal and high-standard farming conditions. Our conclusion is based on a low amount of evidence.

Likelihood
Potential
Certainty

LARVAE: aggressive 3 26, cannibalism 26. Size grading decreases aggression 27.

JUVENILES: aggressive in early stages, which may be reduced by size grading and unrestricted feeding 26. Stressed by conspecific attacks in normal rearing conditions 26.

ADULTS: no data found yet.

SPAWNERS: no data found yet.




7  Substrate

Depending on where in the water column the species lives, it differs in interacting with or relying on various substrates for feeding or covering purposes (e.g., plants, rocks and stones, sand and mud). What is the probability of providing the species' substrate and shelter needs in captivity?

It is low for minimal farming conditions. It is medium for high-standard farming conditions. Our conclusion is based on a medium amount of evidence.

Likelihood
Potential
Certainty

LARVAE: WILD: seek shelter under sargassum weed 1. FARM: no reports of shelter structures found in the literature.

JUVENILES: WILD: pelagic 1 4 6 5 open water swimmers 7. Epibenthic for feeding purposes 5FARM:  sea cages  8 9. For details of holding systems  crit. 1 and 2.

ADULTS:  JUVENILES.

SPAWNERSWILD: pelagic 1 4 6 5 open water swimmers 7. Epibenthic for feeding purposes 5FARM: saltwater tanks 15. For details of holding systems  crit. 1 and 2.

 



8  Stress

Farming involves subjecting the species to diverse procedures (e.g., handling, air exposure, short-term confinement, short-term crowding, transport), sudden parameter changes or repeated disturbances (e.g., husbandry, size-grading). What is the probability of the species not being stressed?

It is low for minimal farming conditions. It is medium for high-standard farming conditions. Our conclusion is based on a medium amount of evidence.

Likelihood
Potential
Certainty

LARVAE: no data found yet.

JUVENILES: for stress and aggression crit. 6.

ADULTS JUVENILES.

SPAWNERS: for stress and reproduction crit. 4.




9  Malformations

Deformities that – in contrast to diseases – are commonly irreversible may indicate sub-optimal rearing conditions (e.g., mechanical stress during hatching and rearing, environmental factors unless mentioned in crit. 3, aquatic pollutants, nutritional deficiencies) or a general incompatibility of the species with being farmed. What is the probability of the species being malformed rarely?

There are unclear findings for minimal and high-standard farming conditions. Our conclusion is based on a low amount of evidence.

Likelihood
Potential
Certainty

LARVAE: mesocosm: 3.5% survival rate, <1% abnormalities 3.

JUVENILESno data found yet.

ADULTS: no data found yet.




10  Slaughter

The cornerstone for a humane treatment is that slaughter a) immediately follows stunning (i.e., while the individual is unconscious), b) happens according to a clear and reproducible set of instructions verified under farming conditions, and c) avoids pain, suffering, and distress. What is the probability of the species being slaughtered according to a humane slaughter protocol?

It is low for minimal farming conditions. It is high for high-standard farming conditions. Our conclusion is based on a low amount of evidence.

Likelihood
Potential
Certainty

Common and high-standard slaughter method: for congener Seriola lalandi, a protocol for electrical stunning and killing by immersion in icewater is available: most effective when stunned for 5 s (124 V dc and 11 Vrms ac 100 Hz) and placed in icewater for 10 min 28. Further research needed to determine whether this applies to S. dumerili as well.




11  Side note: Domestication

Teletchea and Fontaine introduced 5 domestication levels illustrating how far species are from having their life cycle closed in captivity without wild input, how long they have been reared in captivity, and whether breeding programmes are in place. What is the species’ domestication level?

DOMESTICATION LEVEL 2 29, level 5 being fully domesticated.




12  Side note: Forage fish in the feed

450-1,000 milliard wild-caught fishes end up being processed into fish meal and fish oil each year which contributes to overfishing and represents enormous suffering. There is a broad range of feeding types within species reared in captivity. To what degree may fish meal and fish oil based on forage fish be replaced by non-forage fishery components (e.g., poultry blood meal) or sustainable sources (e.g., soybean cake)?

All age classes: WILD: carnivorous 4 2 30 11. FARM: for juveniles, fish meal may be partially* 31 or completely* replaced by sustainable sources 32.

*partly = <51% – mostly = 51-99% – completely = 100%




Glossary


LARVAE = hatching to mouth opening, for details Findings 10.1 Ontogenetic development
WILD = setting in the wild
FARM = setting in farm environment
JUVENILES = fully developed but immature individuals, for details Findings 10.1 Ontogenetic development
ADULTS = mature individuals, for details Findings 10.1 Ontogenetic development
SPAWNERS = adults that are kept as broodstock
LAB = setting in laboratory environment
OCEANODROMOUS = living and migrating in the sea
DOMESTICATION LEVEL 2 = part of the life cycle closed in captivity, also known as capture-based aquaculture 29



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